Art works in the Palace

Art in Palace‘Books’ of the past were piles of palm recorded texts are called PAYSAR parabeik, PAYSAR word in reference to the use of palm leaves and parabeik book means.

When the paper has become more readily available, the court of artists began to use it in almost the same way as the palm part: rectangular, but larger. The paper glued together long leaves convenience allowed to be created, sometimes up to 20 feet. The length is then folded into accordion folds to resemble palm leaves stacked.

Read also : History of Myanmar Art

When it was developed, the long length means a series of scenes can be painted on both sides of a story as the life of Buddha. Shrubs, trees or filling animal scenes in the woods marked the calendar. The figures are usually set on the third side, filled with a solid color between fine and clean lines; the use of perspective was unknown, like light and shadow. However, two Italian artists were hired to do some interior decoration work for the new Mandalay Palace, where the royal capital was moved from Amarapura Mandalay in 1859; they and other artists who came to Western envoys, court artists during the reign of King Mindon (r 1853-1878) and King Thibaw (r 1878-1885) began experimenting with Western ideas but not to the point of making Art in the Western style.

These books are called child parabeik folding yoke. Perhaps some could be called the first Burmese newspapers as recorded surprising news of the day, like a pair of giraffes presented to the king for foreign emissaries or stranding siren. Kyar U Nyunt was the leading artist of the Court leads a team of 20; They produced folding picture books as textbooks for the real nursery, or the King to present as gifts to the monks or Western envoys and great fun royal family. Many books have been records of court life, as ceremonies or twelve annual trips taken by the king and his entourage.

Read also : Myanmar Handmade toys

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